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 Breakfast at Home

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Peter
Amigo
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Posts : 1108
Join date : 2011-02-20
Location : Morelia
Humor : Ironic

20110321
PostBreakfast at Home

This morning I remembered to bring my camera to the breakfast table, something I am not in the habit of doing. This is a typical breakfast though some are more colorful at times, the only thing prompting me today was having my camera handy.

Here is a photo of huevos revueltos, tocino, grits, asparago, linaza wheat toast with mermalada de zarzamora, and melón con yógur y granola. Chile salsa is sprinkled on everthing as well, chili powder with lemon on the fruit.



Tere calls this gringo-style for the grits and asparagus but sometimes she makes chilequiles or something more typically Mexican-style. Her own touches she gives French toast with crema and fruit is a bit fusion.

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"There is no route out of the maze. The maze shifts as you move through it because it is alive. "
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Last edited by Peter on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 16:51; edited 1 time in total
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Breakfast at Home :: Comments

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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Mon 21 Mar 2011, 23:47 by Peter
Most morning Tere will eat the same as myself for breakfast but will often have something different altogether. This morning she was eating the papaya seen in the photo further down the table. Along with this she had a couple hot cakes with a cup of hot milk. She also had some of the multi-grain linaza toast with mermelada.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 10:24 by Peter
Another "gringo" breakfast today of huevos estrellados doused in salsa, potato patties (the frozen kind, cooked on the plancha) with salsa and ketchup, wheat toast with with mermelada de naranja, gringo breakfast sausage links, and papaya with lemon, yogurt, and granola.



What makes this noteworthy is the sausage links that are so common NOB are not found everywhere here. Only Superama carries these in the Morelia area. When first stumbling across them after several years living here I picked up a package to try at home. These have since become a favorite with Tere and are regularly included in our breakfasts.

Today Tere joined me eating the same menu as myself. I think those sausage links were something she was looking forward to today for herself. Also noteworthy, Superama carries Italian sausages and many items that are not easily found elsewhere. They also have a fairly extensive selection of oriental foods and condiments as well as sheets of nori, the seaweed used in Japanese recipes.

The Tajin brand condiment of ground chile and lemon I use on my fruits at breakfast and for botanas. A must to use on pepinos, jicama, and papaya.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 14:59 by JimRP
Very nice, Pete! You know how to live, Amigo.

BTW, Costco also carries the Johnsonville Italian sausage you find at Superama, as well as some other Johnsonville sausages. For awhile they also had some wonderful, premium sausages from Aidells in the US, however haven't carried them for a few months now. I hope they come back.

Jim
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 15:30 by Don Cuevas
Just a suggestion, Peter: if you changed the subject line to "Breakfasts At My Your Place", or similar, you might get additional contributions from other members.

Incidentally, the most recent blog post for Good Food Mexico City is about breakfasts favorite restaurants of the blog author, Nick Gilman.
Wake-up Call. Breakfast Mexican style
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 15:41 by JimRP
Hey Don Cuevas....

Have you got a wonderful, recommended breakfast spot (expat or Mexicano) in Morelia?

Jim
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 16:55 by Peter
I've been looking, Jim, for years around here. Not too bad is breakfast at Club Campestre. The next closest place for the best breakfasts in Mexico is in Ajijic.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 17:53 by JimRP
I hear you, Pete, and I feel your pain.... I did know a couple in Ajijic. I just don't know any here. I figured if anyone would, it would be our resident foodie guru, Don Cuevas!
Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 18:39 by Guest
Costco has GREAT gringo breakfast sausage in their freezer department. Tastes like the real stuff... Probably because it is. I've seen the Johnsonville offerings in both Costco and Mega, but those are all like supersized Eckrich smokees with different twists... Good, but when i think of EYE-tallian sausage, I think of the stuff I grew up with in Detroit's East site Pizzahoods. I will give Superama a looksee.

My absolute favorite breakfast is at the Hotel Casino in the Portales. Next would be the chilaquiles at the Hotel Mason Iturbe in Patzcuaro. That "other place" where folks go to play office in the morning, IMHO, is only good for coffee and dessert.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Tue 22 Mar 2011, 19:07 by Peter
There are restaurants that offer a variety of things for the various meals that would satisfy most any craving but what is lacking is a good breakfast spot. There are any number of local offerings that make for a good breakfast, a number of local foods that fill the bill most of the time, However, here in Morelia and the greater area there is no one that does a real gringo breakfast. These kinds of things I have to eat at home.

I think someone could make a killing if they offered biscuits and gravy, with biscuits that were not sweet. Although many local folks will not try something different many do have a taste for gringo items. Once they tried them they would return for more. That would not matter much, not at first, there are enough ex-pats craving familiar breakfast foods. But look out if people caught-on.

What is served in many places here is not far afield but just needs some fine-tuning to be the real-deal. Tere for one has certainly caught-on to gringo delicacies, such simple things as biscuits, french toast, and American-type breakfast sausage. And I still like huevos rancheros as well.

We were supposed to get our new stove last week but the company says their Visa card machine is broken and would be a week before being fixed. I have already paid them half to hold the stove we selected until our kitchen was ready, and now it is just a matter of paying the other half to have them deliver it but is too large a purchase to pay cash from a cajero automatico as it would take several visits pulling out my daily maximum, too much hassle so we wait. We will check with them tomorrow morning, though they are supposed to call us when they can accept our payment. Once that is in-place and operating I will have to do some weekly Club breakfasts here at the house perhaps.


Last edited by Peter on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 09:29; edited 1 time in total
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Sorry I'm late to breakfast
Post on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 05:23 by Don Cuevas
I would have posted earlier, but our Internet connection goes to a snail's pace in the afternoons.

JimRP wrote:
Hey Don Cuevas....

Have you got a wonderful, recommended breakfast spot (expat or Mexicano) in Morelia?

Jim

Jim, I just don't know Morelia that well. The first place that comes to mind is the Trico Restaurant in Centro.

Outside of Morelia, I'd give a vote to Fonda Mamá Lupe's in Pátzcuaro, and farther afield, El Gorjeo de Las Aves En Las Mañanas de Abril, at Ziracuaretiro, on route to Uruapan. Mamá Lupe's is very inexpensive but very satisfactory (except for the coffee and the chair seats.). El Gorgeo is a gorgeous garden spot, outdoors, in the warm Tierra Caliente clmate, and whle the menu is fairly short, it's very good. Birdsongs in April Mornings

Gringo breakfasts, Peter? I suppose that if iHop opened in Morelia, we might go there a few times a year, but meanwhile, I can cook gringo breakfasts at home.
Have any of you tried the breakfasts at Fonda Marceva in Morelia Centro?
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 07:58 by Peter
Fonda Marceva not yet, I've seen they serve breakfast and try to remember to try it sometime. They are good for everything else they do there. Tried Trico's a couple times but it has been a disappointment each time. Ihop might work here but didn't attract me back in California. Ajijic has good breakfast spots that are not Ihop-ish.

There was a lady that served breakfast at here home in the Guadalupe colonia. She tended to attract a big crowd but doesn't seem to be doing it anymore. Her selections were wide enough to satisfy. Didn't have some of the largely "gringo" offereings like biscuits or french toast and such but eggs, bacon, and potatoes qualifies. Also had Mexican things like chilequiles and enchiladas which would make gringo menus more complete as well. I haven't found a regular commercial restaurant come anywhere close to what she was doing. Wish there were more like her's. it was the best I found anywhere in Morelia.

As you can see, we do breakfast at home too. Not a lot of choices elsewhere.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 09:14 by JimRP
Thanks for the suggestions, Don Cuevas. You are providing me a list of places to try. Trico in Centro has just moved. It is now at the corner of Allende and Abasolo--the street that runs by the Hotel Virrey de Mendoza. It looks out on the main plaza. I haven't been to check it out yet, but I'm not certain they still have a restaurant.

I can hardly complain. Any of us living in Morelia Centro have many options for breakfast with all the hotels, and even with Denny's like places such as VIP's or Sanborne's. But I'm looking for something great and not expensive, and that I haven't found. I hadn't noticed that Fonda Marceva offered breakfast--something to try.

Phil, while I agree Johnsonville isn't the best, it does taste like Italian sausage! I prefer thick slab bacon over breakfast sausage links, and fortunately that is available many places. The only Italian sausage I've seen at Superama is the Johnsonville product.

For now, it appears the best breakfast spot may be Pete's house! Razz

Jim
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 09:37 by Peter
Phil Micheal wrote:
Good, but when i think of EYE-tallian sausage, I think of the stuff I grew up with in Detroit's East site Pizzahoods. .

With your knowledge of what makes a good sausage and your connections with those restaurant owners it would be great if you could have them producing some quality products as that.

Don Cuevas - You mention summer savory spice for sausage making, any idea what that is called here or where to find any?
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A menudo como el menudo.
Post on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 10:01 by Don Cuevas
Peter, I don't know what summer savory is called here, and I don't worry about not having any. I simply substitute mejorana, tomillo, and salvia. (Marjoram, thyme and sage.) Whatever proportions please you.

Today for breakfast we had an international meal: sliced mango, freshly squeezed orange juice, and stone ground yellow corn grits, topped with queso regganito and sun dried tomaoes in herbed olive oil.

I'm still hungry.

EDIT: I have to add that I enjoy the type of Mexican breakfast that involves a meaty, spicy soup. In that category are barbacoa de borrego, birria and on occasion, menudo. When we are eating out, I would tend to go to that sort of place, more than I'd get fancy egg dishes.

Last Friday, I was surprised that the menuderías at Plaza San Francisco in Pátzcuaro were doing a booimg business. (That being a Lenten Friday. Maybe menudo doesn't count as red meat.) Anyway, I had a bowl of spicy menudo at Menudería Teré's, with "patita", a bunch of hot tortillas, all for $35 MN. A tall glass of OJ from the neighboring stand added $10. It's surprisingly filling.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 10:51 by Peter
This morning Tere fixed a decidedly more Mexican-style breakfast of huevos estrellados, an open taco de pastor, frijoles refritos with totopos and topped with some crumbled queso, melón with yogurt and granola, and some wheat toast and mermelada. Always fresh salsa on-hand as well.



Tere ate some papaya and a taquito de pastor. She also had some toast and hot milk. Our system has been somewhat disrupted until the new cocina is in-place. It is a normal practice that we make fresh carrot/celery juice for a pre-breakfast before the main breakfast is prepared but we haven't been doing this since we've moved back to the "burbs".


Last edited by Peter on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 11:09; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Wed 23 Mar 2011, 11:06 by Peter
I am with you on the barbacoa, birria, or menudo. We go out on occasion to have those breakfast foods at one of the commercial places about town. It really is just a matter of preparation time for those items for breakfast at home. Tere frequently makes up a pot of barbacoa but that comes for comida.

Our comidas are usually less of an affair than breakfast which tends to be are larger and more elaborate meal of the day. Comida is often barbacoa or a guisado with tortillas to accompany. We go out for comida about once a week or more. Now that we are spearheading FWB club activities we make it a point to have lunch out at favorite local restaurants and invite our Amigos if there is not already a scheduled event on the club calendar.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Thu 24 Mar 2011, 10:53 by Peter
Continuing this series, my breakfast today consisted of huevos revueltos with asparagus pieces and topped with fresh salsa, tocino, grits with butter, and Tere's favorite presentation of french toast with sweetened plain yogurt, banana slices, blackberry jam, and a sprinkling of granola.


Tere had some french toast prepared in this fashion with some tocino slices and a cup of hot milk. I saw a bottle of Tabasco chipotle flavor yesterday at Superama and decided to try it. I had a few drops on my eggs this morning and it is very good.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Fri 25 Mar 2011, 05:26 by Don Cuevas
Peter wrote:
"I saw a bottle of Tabasco chipotle flavor yesterday at Superama and decided to try it. I had a few drops on my eggs this morning and it is very good.

Look for Salsa Cosecha Purhépecha, especially the Chipotle variety. (We've seen it now in Wal Mart and in Superama.) The company, located in Chilchota, Michoacán, makes several different flavors of salsa. They are almost all thick and rich. Our favorites are the chipotle, the chile de árbol, and the Habanero Rojo. (The latter applied in discreet drops.)
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Fri 25 Mar 2011, 17:50 by Peter
Another day another exceptional breakfast. Enchiladas? No, Tere says they are enjitomatadas, no chile but the tortillas de maíz cooked in her own spiced tomato salsa and filled with spiced ground beef w/onion and topped with cheese. Served with two huevos estrellados with chile and some of the best tasting mango we've had in awhile - not too sweet nor tart, and very flavorful - topped with strawberry yogurt.



With a small glass of Florida ruby red grapefruit juice - store-bought but tasty nonetheless.
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Fri 25 Mar 2011, 18:40 by Hound Dog
Peter wrote:
....What makes this noteworthy is the sausage links that are so common NOB are not found everywhere here. Only Superama carries these in the Morelia area. When first stumbling across them after several years living here I picked up a package to try at home. These have since become a favorite with Tere and are regularly included in our breakfasts.


Well, Peter, since you are a fan of Super Lake in San Antonio Tlayacapan, you must know that commercially prepared American style breakfast sausages as displayed on your post are always available at that fine food emporium in abundance but I´m not really selling that product since, here in Chiapas, I am certain, there are far superior varieties of breakfast sausages available locally but here is the kicker:

You be eatin´ grits with that breakfast and as a born and bred Alabama boy I must wonder why one would choose to ingest a tasteless gruel made with ground hominy which is basically denatured and milled corn as an accompaniment to one´s chicken and porker products but also remember that Dawg married a Frog and, as a result, prefers North African/French Grits AKA cous cous to that grits crap his mama fed him but that´s a matter of choice so Dawg has decided to provide you with the number one grits recipe on the planet:

FRIED GRITS A LA DAWG

Leftover grits left to congeal in the refrigerator overnight
Bacon grease (or melted butter or extra virgin olive oil)
Egg batter
One bottle of Havana Club Dark Rum

Slice congealed grits into cakes and dip in egg batter and fry in grease.

Throw resultant grease laden grit cakes in garbage.

Drink bottle of rum.

Call Charlie Sheen´s rehabiliation center and make an appointment.

Do not show up at Charlie Sheen´s.

Repeat above.




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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Sat 26 Mar 2011, 11:01 by Peter
Saturday morning, not quite ready to wrap up this week or this series Tere has prepared another superb breakfast. An egg dish of some sort is usually the main feature and taking center-stage today is an egg pie baked in a puff pastry. Do we still call it quiche if it is fully enclosed? Quiches are typically open pies but I don't believe that is necessarily the rule. Whatever it is properly called this one was made with eggs and crema with tocino, cebollas, chiles marrónes, and mozzarela cheese baked in a puff pastry crust in a round pie pan. This was served with grits and butter, asparagus spears, and melón sprinkled with lemon chile and topped with yogurt and a sprinkling of granola.



Tere had fruit with yogurt and granola along with some linaza multi-grain toast and hot milk. She says she will have some of the quiche a little later on.
Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Sat 26 Mar 2011, 13:20 by Guest
OK I've been needing to find a round pie pan, and now I need to find the puff pastry Pete just mentioned.

AND... SInce no one offered to teach me how to make pie crust, is there anywhere to find frozen ones?

Soon I'll be asking Pete how to block this section of the board. It's starting to get "dangerous".
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Re: Breakfast at Home
Post on Sat 26 Mar 2011, 15:17 by Peter
For a contrast, comida is not as big affair as breakfast. While we wait to finish the kitchen in the main house comida is brought to my computer bench as a very informal meal from our kitchen in the house across the street.


Here I have pechuga de pollo in a creme of asparagus with penne pasta with crema and crumbled queso topping and garlic bread sticks. My ever-present coffee mug makes its appearance here. And for the present I almorzar alone
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Gritty subject
Post on Sat 26 Mar 2011, 21:29 by Dave and Rosy
Quote :
You be eatin´ grits with that breakfast

So where the heck in Michoacán can one purchase those good old US style grits?

And I delight in eatin' all I can whenever, wherever I can! But all mine are gone!...Woe and alas!
Re: Breakfast at Home
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