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 Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants

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Don Cuevas
Amigo


Posts : 281
Join date : 2011-02-21
Location : Michoacán, Mexico
Job/hobbies : Retired
Humor : incomprehensible

20110226
PostPátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants



A perpetual search for good eating in Pátzcuaro has prompted more questions on two of our local Yahoo Groups. My criteria for a "Favorite" are as follows:
• Good food
• Good service
• Reasonable price.

Stuff like chandeliers and linen napkins, waiters with silver serving trays, and magnificent views of the lake are way down on my list of priorities, although I don't mind a nice view or a flowery patio full of art and tchotchkes to enhance the experience.

These, Sir, are my short list of favorites in and close to Pátzcuaro; and if you don't like them, then list your own. I think I can describe one per session here.

Heading up the list; Mariscos La Güera and its branch, Mariscos La Güera Campestre. Consistent most of the time, they do have a tendency to tinker with their successful formula, but over the last 6 years, these have been our most visited restarants here. Our experiences are that it's hard to go wrong with a few seafood tostadas, especially the marlin; or a coctel de camarones, sin o con pulpos. Shrimp prepared simply are best: para pelar, al mojo de ajo, al ajillo, en brocheta (bacon, sweet peppers and onions. Soups; either the caldo de camarones of sopa de mariscos, both involving messy, hands on eating. These are o.k but I always feel awash after eating even the versíon chica. Avoid Crema de Camarones, Pescado a la Veracruzana (they make a strangely minimalist version), anything to do with filete de pescado (they use tasteless tlapia), except perhaps the Filete Relleno de Mariscos.

Whole fish cooked al gusto, although tending to be overcooked, is a good option for hearty eaters. Keep it simple, and it's almost always good. Platos fuertes com with pretty good rice, a basket of bread, and the cucumber-shredded carrot, orange slice and red onion salad garnish, a Mariscos La Güera signature, always lurking in the background. Papas Francesas tend to be way undercooked, but if you ask for them "bien bien doradas", you may get nicely browned ones. We did, recently.

Drinks: decent selection of cervezas, micheladas con Clamato are good, refreshing aguas frescas de frutas above average, limonada made with agua mineral is good. Be sure to stir it well before sipping. The simple syrup is in the bottom.

The standard of hygiene and its practice is well above the local average.
Usually the two of us can have a nice comida, with drinks, for under $250 pesos.

I have a online album, dedicated to Mariscos La Güera here: http://tinyurl.com/MariscosLG

Here's a representative image; if I can get this to work:

Wow! Fourth try's a charm.

(Admin note: moved the photo up to the top so it would display on the preview page)
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Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants :: Comments

Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Sun 27 Feb 2011, 05:26 by Don Cuevas
Designating our second Favorite Pátzcuaro Restaurant is a bit harder. Below is the response I gave to an inquiry on MoreliaConnect:

Lupita's, Mamá Lupe's; El Camino Real (on the eastern outskirts next to a Pemex and an Oxxo; Birrería Don Prisci, preferably the one at El Parián (aka "La Estacíon"); yes, also La Surtidora and Mistongo. La Dolce Vita (open Th. Fr. Sa. Su. from 1:00 p.m). Hamburguesas at Cafetería Chio's, on the third block of Ibarra, just before Espejo, and next to the Carnicería Sin Rival. Tacos "Nacho's" in the front of the Mercado; atole de grano from the ladies stirring the clay pots, evenings on the corner of Plaza Chica, near the water pila, to the west of the Gran Hotel.
Many like the Enchiladas de Pollo Don Emilio, nights at Plaza Chica, but I'm not attracted to it.


We spend a lot of time at La Surtidora, under el Portal Hidalgo, on the Plaza Grande. But we mostly drink coffee or juices/licuados there. Both are good, the waiters are good, and it's Expat Centro, as well as a popular spot for Mexican patrons and visitors. Now, there's the additional attraction of free wi-fi, which works best in the front room, or outside close to the door. Breakfasts are pretty good, but nothing really stands out in my experience. Huevos Tarascos are interesting: fried eggs in a salsa de chile negra, over tortilas, garnished with corn kernels. On the other hand, most expats don't enjoy the aporreadillo of charales scrambled with eggs. (Charales are small lake fish, usually fried to a crispy critter state.)

Other meals I've had have been less successful; as a recent example, a Club Sandwich was dry and boring, although the accompaning Papas Francesas were good. A fancy dish ( a few years ago, it's true.) of thinly pounded pechuga de polla, filled with huitlacoche, in a sauce of chile Poblano, was uniformly boring except for the sauce. Arrachera gets good marks there, so say my friends, but I haven't tried it. Another friend has Caldo de Pollo several times a week.

Restaurante Lupita's, at Buena Vista #7, to the left as you are facing the Basilica, is in a similar price range and shows some flair. Their arrachera is good. It's a lovely setting, site of the former Restaurant Cha Cha Cha, but there's no connection other than that. The chef, Lupita, has talent which shows in some of her creations.


Arrachera at Lupita's

The Best Breakfast at a Bargain Price (table service restaurant category) is undoubtedly Fonda Mamá Lupe's, on Calle Benito Mendoza, in a mini-mall across from Bancomer. $40 pesos gets you juice, coffee, bread, huevos al gusto or chilaquiles, or picante Bisteces a la Mexicana or the usually excellent Enmoladas (tortillas dipped in mole, filled with shredded chicken, and sprinkled with cheese. Notably, the coffee isn't very good, at least, at the Men's breakfasts I've attended.

Comida corrida at Mamá Lupe's runs $45-$55 pesos. There's always a small, fresh salad, an o.k. soup, a choice of guisado from an extensive list. A small dessert, often a square of bakery cake or perhaps a canned peach half makes dessert. An agua fresca is included in the modest price.


One of my criteria for a good restaurante are their salsas. Mamá Lupe's is red, potent and good. Photo below.


The truth is, we seldom eat out at the higher priced Pátzcuaro restaurants. We've been to Mistongo a few times in the past, and it's been pretty good. But those occasions were so long ago, I don't feel qualified to comment on it.

That's all for today. Next time, Restaurant El Camino Real, near Tzurumutaro, and perhaps others.


The venerable Restaurante El Camino Real


Last edited by Don Cuevas on Sun 27 Feb 2011, 05:28; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : spelling)
Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Sun 27 Feb 2011, 12:03 by cheenagringo
RE: Restaurant Mistongo

On each of our three visits to Patzcuaro, we have eaten at Mistongo. Admittedly, it hasn't been exactly jumping with customers on any of our visits but there has been a side benefit of not having more than three tables occupied on any visit. The one particular waitress who has served us each time has been extremely pleasant and attentive! Kathy and I have made a point of ordering something different each visit and I wouldn't say that we have ever been anything less than extremely satisfied. Between the attractive decor and relative quiet while having a relaxing dinner, I would venture to say that we will always plan to eat there on future visits to Patzcuaro.

Yes, it does fall into a more expensive category but since we visit for both business and vacation, it is allowable in our budget.

Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants—Continued
Post on Sun 06 Mar 2011, 04:42 by Don Cuevas
El Camino Real, mentioned earler, has been in business for many years. It offers solid, middle class Mexican cooking. The menu is long and varied. Some of it's very good, but a few dishes are duds. A lot depends on when you eat there as well as what you order. With a carta del día (comida corrida, about $60 pesos), it's inevitable that some dishes will be made much better than others.

Here are a few highlights, in our experience.
There's always a bowl of housemade lightly pickled vegetables, plus excellent salsa and a basket of bread. (The breakfasts are usually enhanced by the excellent teleras from the wood fired ovens of Panadería La Espiga.)


Soups are good, especially the Caldo de Pollo con Verduras.
The Olla Podrida is a hearty soup, almost a light stew, of different meats and vegetables.
I'm not a big fan of Sopa Tarasca, so I'll leave that one aside. Friends whove had it enjoyed it.

For the second course, sopa seca, there's usually Arroz Canario, Maccarones con queso y crema, or the unusual, light and tasty, Ceviche de Hongos. We favor the latter two items.


For the plato fuerte, you'll be faced with a long list of possibilities, especially on weekends.
My wife sometimes orders the flete de pescado ranchera, a mild fish accompanied by a good salsa with nopales.
We often order the Conejo al Ajillo, moist, tender rabbit braised with garlic, chile guajillo and tomatoes.
Enchiladas, in a variety of styles, are a good bet.



if I recall correctly, the meal comes with a jarra of agua fresca,usually there are two flavors from which to choose. Of course, hot tortillas accompany every meal.

The meal finishes with a small dessert, but it's not a high point of the meal. Usually, it's a small pudding. The last time we ate there, the dessert was "natillas", a sort of blanc mange of essentially no flavor and a starchy texture. You can't win 'em all.

Service is usually very good, but be forewarned that weekend afternoons after 3:00 p.m. get very busy. There's often a waiting line, the tables are crowded together; the service gets hectic, although the waiters do their best, and sometimes, unfortunately, the kitchen gets sloppy in their output.

Breakfast at El Camino Real are a treat. It's inexpensive, usually under $60 for a complete breakfast, and the menu offers the greatest number of choices of any restaurant in the Pátzcuaro area.


Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Sun 06 Mar 2011, 07:47 by Peter
With our limited experience of Camino Real I tend to agree with all you said about it. It is among our favorite places in all of Morelia/Pátzcuaro area. Breakfast there is a "must do" experience which we never pass up when close by. There is no other place for many miles that makes a better breakfast. For that we must pay a visit to Ajijic.
Just back from Mariscos La Güera Campestre
Post on Sun 06 Mar 2011, 17:30 by Don Cuevas
We went today, March 6, 2011, later than usual, arriving about 3:30. The huge dining room was better than half full and the parking spaces were almost full as well.
When we left over an hour later, it was 3/4 full inside.


There were triple the usual number of servers that we'd see on wweekday visits. Yet service was swift and friendly, the food was fine, we asked for extra condiments and they were brought quickly.

Sra. Cuevas had a tostada de marlin. At first we were told that they were out of this tasty, smokey appetizer, but within a few moments, one appeared at our table.
Her main course was a medium coctel of camarones y pulpos. It was nicely prepared. She asked for extra cilantro, and the manager, Eugenio, brought not only cilantro, but chopped onion and a wedge of ripe avocado.

I wanted something lighter than usual, so I asked for a large Ensalada de Mariscos, sin ostiones ni pata de mula (a dark fleshed mollusc in a ribbed shell.) I just don't eat raw molluscs in Mexico. (Long and unpleasant story.) However, I will eat Tiritas al Limón (strips of raw fish "cooked" in lime juice), and the similarly prepared Camarones en Aguachile. Rounding out the trio (although you may choose up to four mariscos) were six succulent just-boiled camarones para pelar. This array of freshly prepared seafood is served on the Mariscos La Güera backdrop salad of lettuce, sliced tomato, cucumber, shredded carrots, and a few rngs of purple onion. The platter is ringed by slices of orange. (You shall see this tomorrow after I upload a photo.)

Teleras and tostada shells come with the meal, as well as the obligatory Gamesa Saladitas.
With the meal we drank some limonada, made with mineral water.

The bill was $278 MN, plus a decent tip; more than we usually spend, but still a deal if you figure it was about $25 USD.
We enjoyed seeing the popularity of the restaurant which is well deserved, owing to the hard work done by the owners and employees. They are really an outstanding and friendly team.

The photos are back from the drugstore. Here's a few.


Ensalada de Mariscos Grande, no molluscs.


Ceviches, tiritas and guisado de marlin for a group. Usual presentation is different.

The entire album of 133 images, over 5 years, can be viewed here: https://picasaweb.google.com/104875488785418381911/MariscosLaGuera#


Last edited by Don Cuevas on Mon 07 Mar 2011, 03:25; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : Added more photos)
New dining area at Mariscos La Güera Campestre
Post on Tue 28 Jun 2011, 06:12 by Don Cuevas
Mariscos La Güera Campestre has added a new, rear dining room. We ate in there Sunday afternoon.

It will be a nice space, when it's finished. The chairs are snazzier, too,





I was highly irritated by the barking/yapping of Manager Eugenio's dog, tied up in the garage out back. The problem is that the new space is not yet closed in at the back, and the sound of Yapper, el perro, carries into the dining room. It also lets in flies, but there weren't many.

The food was still good, but for the near future, we'll stick with the front dining room. The cute waitresses are there, also, but they will need to hire lots more to help serve the hundreds of guests who will throng the restaurant in search of good seafood.



Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Tue 28 Jun 2011, 13:49 by cheenagringo
While it isn't my nature to plan ahead when it comes to dining, the demise of Mistongo forces me into a new research mode. Since we typically run pretty hard during the day, a mid-day meal tends to be catch as catch can. On the other hand, our habits or tendencies in the evening can be quite different. We enjoy going back to our hotel to unwind and maybe have a couple of adult beverages while relaxing and enjoying the courtyard. We typically start considering a dinner spot around 7:00 or 7:30. We do enjoy walking to dinner and enjoying a sit down meal while discussing the fun we had that day. Won't say that we are high maintenance when it comes to service but we do enjoy good food.

I think that we will be trying Lupita's, El Camino Real (lunch?), Marisco's La Guera (not sure which location). TripAdvisor mentions La Dolce Vita, La Surtidora and El Viejo Gaucho. La Dolce Vita has been mention in passing on this forum without many comments. We have tried La Surtidora for breakfast and cannot say we were overly impressed. El Viejo Gaucho is a total unknown.

We would certainly appreciate any suggestions and further comments on restaurants in Patzcuaro.
Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Fri 01 Jul 2011, 03:27 by Don Cuevas
Another visit to La Güera, yesterday, Thursday, June 30. We'd intended to eat with our friend, Ron, at La Entrada, at the Glorieta across from Bodega Aurrerá, but it was closed for a brief vacation. So we decided to drive up to the Mariscos La Güera matriz, on Federico Tena at Libramiento.

It was a cool and rainy day. Perfect for a steaming hot bowl of Caldo de Camarones, which Sra. Cuevas wisely chose. She requested extra vegetables and got them.


Soup, beautiful soup

Ron ordered the Coctel de Camarones, which was good, although Ron always hopes for some special touch that will lift his food to an ambrosial level. Razz

I saw that Langostinos were on the menu, for only $138 pesos a kilo. I ordered them al mojo de ajo. They were a very attractive presentation. The shells were pre-split, so extracting the sweet nuggets of baby lobster meat wasn't too difficult. This process required considerable finger work, nibbling and licking the garlic butter sauce from the fingers. It was a bit more work to eat than my usual order, but the experience was worthwhile.


Langostinos al Mojo de Ajo

Our meal, with 1 agua mineral, 1 michelada con clamato came to $318 plus tip.
Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Thu 02 May 2013, 05:40 by Peter
We had comida yesterday at LangosTiko's after a time of not being out for mariscos for quite awhile. The comida made me think of the wonderful photos by Don Cuevas at his favorite Pátzcuaro resaurants posted here. The sight of these dishes was worth a comment and a bump up the list to put these excellent photos up on top of the page of this Comida forum.

I have been busy with other pursuits and not had a time to visit with old friends. Indeed, I took a long hiatus from blogging and this site has faded into obscurity. It has been months since anything has been added, the site losing its focus and never gaining the traction we had hoped for.

Well, nowadays, in fact very recently, I have started back in again blogging about Mexico but on a site that is new for me and under new ownership and seems to be up and coming. That new site covers all of Latin America but not surprisingly has its largest forum focusing on Mexico - Gringos.com  that is  www.gringos.com where I was just recently invited on staff as a moderator in the Mexico Forum. I just happened to stumble onto the site and found it had a pleasant and friendly atmosphere with active forums. I think I will call it home for awhile and hope some old friends will drop by and check the place out. If it attracts some talent like we had here for a time, especially with great contributers like the Don it will be the place to be. I hope he finds this and drops in sometime.

There are very few visitors here on this site anymore but if any of you happen to see this posting then you will know where to find me these days. I hope you will drop by Gringos.com and even check in around here now and then. Who knows, someday this place might get exciting again. Hola to all our AMIGOs. Hope to see you soon. Que te vaya bien.


Last edited by Peter on Fri 09 Aug 2013, 20:17; edited 1 time in total
Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Fri 09 Aug 2013, 13:50 by Don Cuevas
Peter, I had wondered what had happened to you and this site. I now post on Chapala.com web board, Inside Lakeside, and expat mexico forum. It's a lot of forums! I will look into Gringos.com.

Saludos,
Don Cuevas
Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Fri 09 Aug 2013, 20:23 by Peter
Glad to hear you are well and doing fine, Don Cuevas. I almost dropped in on you the other day but discovered I hadn't transferred all my numberts to a new cell phone I was carrying and then didn't want Tere and I to drop in unannounced.


After getting my Residente Permanente I figured it was time to buy a local car and phase out my foreign-plated vehicle. Having a Michoacán-plated car gives me a little more peace of mind to move around and about once again. I hope to catch up to you seen and will make it out to your neck of the woods. I need some pointers on Pátzcuaro restaurants, especially how to find them. I use the name Eron on www.gringos.com so all y'all look for me there. Bye for now.
Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Sat 10 Aug 2013, 02:47 by Don Cuevas
Hola, Peter, we also are in the RP transition and have just nationalized our vehicle. But I prefer not to discuss that on Internet fora.

We are still living in the same place. It has been 7 years this month.

I took a fast look at Gringos.com yesterday evening, but I wasn't attracted by all the ads and that a lot of the stuff was similar to Expats Living Mexico

Saludos,
Don Cuevas
Re: Pátzcuaro Favorite Restaurants
Post on Sat 10 Aug 2013, 06:02 by Peter
I just finished registering mine. Bother. Expensive. Life...  I will be in touch before long.

Gringos site is not that eye appealing, granted. It has good content though, nice crowd. It is international with forums for all of Latin America. Mexico is the most active forum but at my request we opened a food forum that is starting to get some good activity. Members can have photo albums they host on-site so am easily able to post recent pics rapidly. Presently we have been discussing pizza, chili, hot dogs, and a few other items like corned beef and such. Time to tell them about the famous Fusion Food Fest of Tzintzuntzan.
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