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 The Truth About Bacon - I'm up for a BLAT - Bacon, Lettuce, Avocado, Tomato

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Peter
Amigo


Posts : 1108
Join date : 2011-02-20
Location : Morelia
Humor : Ironic

20110420
PostThe Truth About Bacon - I'm up for a BLAT - Bacon, Lettuce, Avocado, Tomato

Check out this site for some nutritional tips and info, some of which may surprise you. For too long we have been fed a line of baloney about what is good for us and what is not. some of the good nutrition hype has actually been selling our health down the river for years. In some cases what we've been told is good sense isn't. Some of that is because back then we just didn't know better.

http://natural.getprograde.com/the-truth-about-bacon.html?advert_id=bacon
Quote :
When people today think of bacon, they think of clogged arteries, love handles and sin. They also think of Homer Simpson… That’s right: eating bacon means that you’re destined for heart disease, a fat belly and a lifetime in Satan’s dungeon-Doh!

But, thinking this way is a terrible misconception. In truth, bacon is a very good addition to your diet and should be something enjoyed more often than you endulge in pancakes and syrup or crepes with brown sugar. Pancakes and syrup may look good to some people, but it is not good for you at all… Bacon is not an unhealthy food when choosen correctly.

By reading this article your’re going to learn why and how to properly add bacon to your diet, and you’re going to start doing it now.

What Is Bacon? Bacon is a cured meat (a natural way to prevent the meat from spoiling by way of salt, and often nitrites) that traditionally comes from a pig. It consists of both the meat of the pig, plus the fat (known as lard). Bacon usually comes from either the belly of the pig, the back or the sides. The amount of fat (lard) in bacon depends on how fat the pig is, with the belly usually being fattier than the back, especially in America. Today, you can also find bacon made from turkey, but if you actually spent time reading the label of turkey bacon, you’d see it contains a laundry list of ingredients, many of which are not good for you such as hydrolyzed corn gluten, soy protein, wheat gluten, disodium inosintae, silicon dioxide and nitrites.

Europeans Have It Right All over Germany, pork reigns supreme. From bacon to sausage to lard, no parts of the pig are left unused. And, if you take a good look at traditional Germans, you will notice that they are not as overweight as Americans, nor suffer the same incidences of chronic disease. A traditional German plate Unlike modern-day Americans, Europeans use lard for most of their baking and cooking.

Previously in the US, we also use to incorporate a lot of lard into our daily diets, but with the notion (from our government) that pig fat is too “saturated” and unhealthy, we shifted to the use of hydrogenated plant oils (aka., vegetable shortening ) which actually made us sicker, fatter and more diseased.

Why Bacon is Better

To understand why bacon, and the fat it’s rich in (lard) is a healthy choice for us to use in our diets along with other beneficials fats and proteins, let’s look at the nutritional science of this food. If we take 1 tablespoon of pure lard, we see that is consists of an even balance of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, with some polyunsaturates and cholesterol (all animal fats contain cholesterol), but no trans fats.

Specifically, it contains*:
• 5.9 grams of saturated fatty acids
• 6.4 grams monounsaturated fatty acids
• 2 grams polyunsaturated fatty acids (mostly omega-6)
• 14 mg cholesterol( *anaylsis from Mass Spectrometry at Univeristy of Alberta, 20030

If you compare lard to vegetable shortening, you get**:
• 3.8 grams saturated fatty acids
• 6.7 grams monounsaturated fatty acids
• 3.9 grams polyunsaturated fatty acids (mostly omega-6)
• 2 grams trans fatty acids (man-made)
• 0 mg cholesterol (**anaylsis from ESHA Food Processor)

What’s most frightening, is the trans fats found in this man-made, fake lard substitute – trans fats have now been linked directly to heart disease morbidity and mortality, and there is a strong move to rid our shelves of this dangerous fat as soon as possible.

Saturated Fat is Not Bad Some people still think saturated fats are evil, and as a result have banned bacon from their homes. However, fatty acid experts today emphasize that saturated fat from natural sources like meats, dairy, and tropical oils (coconut, palm) are not detrimental for our health, but instead much better than the polyunsaturated and hydrogenated substitutes we’ve been recently using. Sure, maybe it’s confusing to try and tell yourself that saturated fat isn’t bad like we once thought.However, it’s important that you realize that we were fed lies and deception that only made us fatter, sicker and more unhealthy. We need to change this way of thinking. The bottom line is that saturated fats, like that found in bacon CAN and SHOULD fit into a healthy diet –a diet low in sugar, processed carbohydrates, and synthetic chemicals, but high in fresh low-pesticide vegetables, organic meats and fish, and nuts and seeds. Essential Omega-6 and Omega-3 Balance

What about the omega-6 fats in bacon? Some people feel that bacon and other foods containing omega-6 polyunsaturated fats should be minimized, and a focus placed on omega-3 fats such as fish, flax and certain nuts - which is both true and untrue. It is correct that we should try to keep a fairly close balance between the omega-6 fats (found in most meats and some nuts and seeds) and the omega-3 fats, but we can’t completely eliminate omega-6s in favor of omega-3s. Not only is it almost impossible, unless you eat completely fat-free meats and avoid all nuts and oils, but your body needs omega-6s because they are ESSENTIAL – meaning necessary for proper metabolic and physiologic function. It’s more important to maintain a healthy ratio of omega-6 fats found in foods like bacon, with omega-3 fats found in DHA-enriched eggs and omega-3 rich fish.

For example, a great breakfast combination would be a few slices of bacon with omega-3 DHA eggs topped with organic salsa and avocado. Delishious and nutritious! The Science of Bacon Fat In 2003, I conducted a research study at the University of Alberta looking at the effects of a high bacon fat diet compared to a high palm oil diet on the cholesterol synthesis and inflammation profiles of ten healthy men. I cooked all the food for these guys every day, so all they ate was what I gave them.

They ate things like:
• (BLLTs) Bacon, Lettuce, Lard and Tomato sandwiches
• Hash Browns cooked in lard
• Bacon and Egg Omletes cooked in lard (To say I smelled like bacon all the time was a compliment…)

After 6 weeks on each diet, their blood was analyzed for cholesterol synthesis rates, cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, and markers of inflammation. What was found was that the high lard diet compared to the high palm oil diet produced significantly lower total cholesterol, and total-cholesterol/HDL cholesterol levels, with slightly lower LDL-cholesterol and inflammatory marker levels. What this means is that fat from lard may be less cholesterolemic and inflammatory than fat from palm oil. This does not mean that palm oil is a bad fat, but instead suggests that lard may be better when consumed often.

Choosing Healthy Bacon Now that you know that the fat in bacon is not bad for you, or harmful for your health, don’t immediately go out and purchase bacon and eat it everyday. First, you need to look for bacon that is nitrite-free. Nitrite (sodium nitrite) is a preservative used in bacon to not only prevent spoilage, but also keep bacon a nice red color. However, nitrite is also a known carcinogen and is related to increased risk and incidences of cancer. So, if you do decide to choose bacon to help you either stick to a lower-carbohydrate diet, or just eat instead of toast and jam, make sure you choose wisely – natural nitrite free bacon is the best. With bacon, you don’t have to worry about the pig being full of artifical or natural hormones, because these are not allowed to be used on pigs.

Eat a Better Breakfast:
Now you know that bacon is a good breakfast food - but it can also be used to enhance the taste of your favorite salads for lunch, or as a side dish at dinner. No matter what you choose to do with your diet, bacon or not, remember that bacon is not bad for you, and will not ruin your health. Also, when eaten in the context of a low-sugar, unprocessed diet, it will not make your belly look like a pig’s. Enjoy!

Judging by the looks of the bacon I get fresh-sliced in the carnicerías and the lack of pure red I would guess these have little or no nitrites used in the process. The packaged bacon from the supermarkets seems a different story though.

Lunch time soon and looking forward to a BLAT sandwich on some linaza whole wheat bread. Yeah, and some Sauer's mayo on that.

_________________
"There is no route out of the maze. The maze shifts as you move through it because it is alive. "
— Philip K. Dick (VALIS)


Last edited by Peter on Wed 20 Apr 2011, 12:53; edited 3 times in total
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The Truth About Bacon - I'm up for a BLAT - Bacon, Lettuce, Avocado, Tomato :: Comments

Speaking of bacon, I was reading through the May issue of BON APPETIT the other day. Wasn't one of their recipes but rather an article about a special burger at a restaurant. Their chef has their ground beef mixed with ground smoked bacon which enhances the flavor while getting rid of the problem of the bacon sliding off the burger when eating. We thought the concept was good but haven't tried it as yet.
cheenagringo wrote:
Speaking of bacon, I was reading through the May issue of BON APPETIT the other day. Wasn't one of their recipes but rather an article about a special burger at a restaurant. Their chef has their ground beef mixed with ground smoked bacon which enhances the flavor while getting rid of the problem of the bacon sliding off the burger when eating. We thought the concept was good but haven't tried it as yet.

More as a matter of expedience we have been buying pre-formed hamburger patties so that it is easy for Tere to make me a quick hamburger straight off the parilla for cena. Many of those we've picked up have bacon mixed in. It makes our sliders less slidable for sure but I miss the texture of bacon strips there on the burger. Another way to look at it is that if she had to make the bacon separately I probably would get any of it at all.

I like to form patties from fresh carne molida using a tortilla press and cook bacon alongside to go on the burger. The tortilla press helps the lean carne stay together and cook quicker. As long as Tere is doing the cooking I won't interfere with her methods. It's all good.
Peter wrote:
Check out this site for some nutritional tips and info, some of which may surprise you.

It would not surprise dawg if the last bus for Mars had been delayed for mechanical deficiencies but that is beside the point.

The perfect BLT without the addition of avocados and, quite frankly, impossible to construct in Mexico normally with its supply of tasteless,commercially available roma tomatoes historically developed and used for cooking rather than sandwich ingredients in a raw state:

Proper BLT - Never to include avocados

Fesh, ripe, in-season heirloom tomatoes sweet and luscious from the garden. Almost impossible to find in Mexico.
Hickory smoked bacon of the highest quality. Thin sliced
"Head" lettuce, fresh and chilled and preferably roughly chopped
The finest mayonnaise slathered over top-quality white bread slices

In ten years in Mexico Dawg has never found even one fresh, organic heirloom tomato worthy of this sandwich, whether in Jalisco or in rustico Chiapas, I defy anyone to find even one tomato worthy of the aforesaid sandwich
anywhere on mainland Mexico. Ain´t gone happen.

Dawg.
Peter:

You really struck a nerve when mentioning pre-formed burger patties. They are one of my pet peeves to the degree that when I go into a nice bar or restaurant for lunch and I am in the mood for a good burger, I will ask if they use pre-formed patties. If so, I will in most all cases move on to another item on the menu. I accept them at a fast food joint or your basic cafe but never when they are charging me $8+ for a burger! I can understand you allowing Tere her way when she is kind enough to cook.

Now that I think about it, it does make sense that in Mexico they mix bacon (pork) into their typically very lean hamburger grind. Here we have pretty much settled on a 83/17 sirloin grind for nice juicy burgers and they are strictly hand patties using no forms or presses. I will be making a trip to the closest specialty meat market to ask them to make up a grind that includes some of their best smoked bacon.

Dawg: Since Peter defined his sandwich as a "BLAT", it would be perfectly acceptable. Now if he had said BLT, then definitely not. I am sure that even a Bama boy can understand that difference!
The vine tomatoes, grown hydroponically and sold, for example at Costco, come as close as they can to a good Jersey or Arkansas tomato. Not quite, but close enough.
They improve a bit if sliced and sprinkled very lightly with salt and sugar and allowed to repose for 5 or so minutes.

We really liked the very expensive Wright's Hickory Smoked, Thick Sliced Bacon as was sold at Sam's Club in Morelia. We gave it up when we gave up our Sam's membership, as we couldn't justify two warehouse club memberships on the basis of mostly bacon.

There's sometimes an Obra Mayor or some such bacon sold at Costco. It's bit too sweet for my taste, and we decided that good old Kirkland bacon was fine.

I simply don't worry about the potential bad health effects of eating bacon. I just don't eat it often.

Oh, just one more thing. You can leave the avocado off mine. It's just a distraction from the perfection of the trinity of BLT. It's not quite as bad as putting a slice of beet, Australian style, on a hamburger, but a distant second.
On Thursday, I went to our closest specialty meat market. Yes, I could get an 80/20 blend of lean ground sirloin and heavy smoked bacon but not until Tuesday. So we tried another experiment last night, Traders Joe's lean ground beef with Trader Joe's chopped Pancetta. Not one of our better experiments and it won't be going into the permanent file of recipes!
19 times out of 20 or more I would make a regular BLT but at the time I posted that I was also craving Avocado. Being a California kid I would have used a wheatberry bread and might have been tempted to add raddish Sprouts for a BLAST. But the other night if I had actually been up to making the sandwich then in all liklihood it would really have been a BLOAT because I would have added Onions also.
I can imagine watercress (berros) would be dynamite on a BBLT.
How do you feel about fresh pineapple on one?
To me, it sounds good, but it would no longer be a BLT.

Now, what about aiolí instead of mayo?

The bread: classic squishy package white is best, perhaps lightly toasted. Light whole wheat is o.k. A BLT on a bagel would be SO wrong, in SO many ways.
Shocked
Don Cuevas wrote:
I can imagine watercress (berros) would be dynamite on a BBLT.
How do you feel about fresh pineapple on one?
To me, it sounds good, but it would no longer be a BLT.

Now, what about aiolí instead of mayo?

The bread: classic squishy package white is best, perhaps lightly toasted. Light whole wheat is o.k. A BLT on a bagel would be SO wrong, in SO many ways.
Shocked

I agree about the bagel though it might go along with some of Mexico's tough bacon found in some carnicerías. Plain white toast is the proper BLT and any deviations cause problems. Served on sliced French bread is taking it to far astray, for example. So many things change a BLT from it true original form and make interesting acronyms but you're right, it is not a BLT then. However there are some good bacon sandwiches. I like onion on just about everything but when added to a BLT it becomes something different.

Not sure around here if seeds for sprouting could be found easily anywhere. I was never much of a fan of alfalfa sprouts but raddish sprouts are something altogether different. On a cold roast beef sandwich raddish sprouts can really make it special but I would use them on a number sandwiches for a little extra zing. A bit like adding horseraddish.

I will admit that it is not a BLT but a BLAST can be its own delight. The name is good if one speaks of raddish and not alfalfa sprouts. This bacon sandwich requires some type of wheatberry bread, avocado, mayo, and onions are permtted. With onions though I guess it could be argued that would be a BLASTO, perhaps a BLASTOFF if served with French Fries??

Too much fun with this. Better leave it alone for another time.
I imagine a Peanut Butter, Bacon, Onion and Tomato Sandwich could be pretty good. I'm not sure that lettuce can find a place in that one, and I'm doubtful about mayo.

(Off topic, true, but we just had terrific Tuna Salad Sandwiches on homemade Potato White Bread. The TS was made along the lines of the recipe of a restaurant where I worked. In addition to the usual ingredients (of which hard cooked egg does not qualify), it is enhanced with a handful of raisins and some sliced almonds.)
If it is any help with your decision, our family used to enjoy a salad with bananas split lengthwise with a dollop of peanut butter and another dollop of real mayo on a bed of lettuce. It presents an unusual combination of tastes.

Along similar lines, one of my favorite sandwiches (again from my younger years) is crunchy peanut butter with a very sharp cheddar cheese. One of the only times that I truly enjoy a very cold cerveza to accompany the sandwich. Another interesting combination of tastes.
One of my favorite sandwiches remains the peanut butter, mayonaise, and banana sandwich. For that reason I think the PeaBBOT could well accomodate the mayo, but lettuce probably not.

Now this time of year I like a lighter fare and in the case of of tuna salad I am more than willing to skip the bread altogether and use a lettuce leaf to roll-up the tuna salad in sort of a tuna lechuga taco.

A side note about the PB. Many years ago a friend kept bugging his wife to make him a pizza. Not sure what all he did to annoy her but to "get even" she spread peanut butter on the the pizza before adding the sauce. He thought that turned out great and insisted on peanut butter pizza regularly since then. I have yet to try that but stranger taste ideas have happened.
We picked up our ground beef and ground smoky bacon order this week and had our first burgers from the mix. Because of the bacon, we didn't put our usual salt as per recommendations but did put our usual seasonings. While I grilled them for a bit too long for our liking, they definitely had a great bacon flavor and were very moist. Some very sharp cheese on top was perfect.
I thought about burgers for our May Eve escapade, taking the virginity of the new stove and using the kitchen for the first time. All sorts of delights danced through my head, but when the moment arrived I just got her hot and started makin' bacon. Toasting some bread was almost an after-thought but we had time for that, we wanted it to be right.
 

The Truth About Bacon - I'm up for a BLAT - Bacon, Lettuce, Avocado, Tomato

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